Friday, May 4, 2012

Chicken Green Korma





"A healthy outside starts from the inside."
(~Robert Urich)

It is unlike the usual kormas, and is definitely not rich and heavy with cream. I ate this dish for the first time at my in-law's place. Ever since then it has been on my list of regulars; it was that delicious! They liked to call it a green korma and made it with mutton. This particular day, I wanted to serve Green Korma and all I had were some drumsticks in the freezer. So out they came to be thawed.

Ingredients:
Chicken drumsticks............8, appx: 550-625 gms, you could use any part of the chicken.
Yoghurt..............................2 tsps
Mustard seeds...................1 tsp
Cinnamon.........................2 sticks
Pepper corns....................20-25
Black cardamom..............2
Cloves..............................6
Green coriander..............a handful
Spring onions..................2, use only the green leaves
Green chilli......................2, or acc to preferred heat level
Garlic..............................5-6 flakes (large variety)
Ginger.............................abt 1" piece
Onions.............................1 chopped
Oil
Salt

Time saver: Chopped onions, peeled garlic flakes and ginger


Rub the chicken with yoghurt and allow it to marinate.


Next grind all the items from mustard seeds to ginger. That's ten items. The green masala you see at the back on the right are these items ground. And the murky green liquid in the front is what I call masala rinse. This is obtained by swirling some water (I used 3/4 cup) in the grinder after the ground spices have been removed! I use it in cooking; for the gravy.


Now heat some olive oil and drop in the chopped oinions.


When the onions begin to brown, add the red chilli powder, turmeric and green masala.


 Stir it in with the onions and brown the lot.


When it is done the oil will separate from the spices thus:

Now add the chicken and mix it well into the browned masala. Continue to brown it on a medium flame.

I am never fully satisfied using the term 'brown' the masala, meat etc, in context to Indian cooking. We use the word "Bhuna" (adj) or "Bhuno" (verb). It is an act of cooking the food on a medium to low flame carefully, taking care not to brown it to the point of burning. It's more about the cooking process than the act of browning. Here's the picture of the process: The sign that it is done can be seen in the second pic. The oil has begun to separate.


Pour in the masala rinse at this point. The quantity of water I used was 3/4 cup. Cover and simmer till water content reduces to form a thick gravy.


This goes well with roti (chapatti) or paratha. I wouldn't recommend it with rice.

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6 comments:

  1. I tried this yummilious recipe last week, everyone who ate loved it! So, I am making it for the second time today for friends :-)

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    Replies
    1. Great indeed! Thank you Ranjit. Do keep trying out dishes here and would love to hear from you.

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  2. I made this. Family loved it :)

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    Replies
    1. Isn't that wonderful! I appreciate hearing from you please do keep foraying into these pages to discover something to try out.

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  3. I've made this a couple of times already and on both occasions it tasted so good. You cannot go wrong with this recipe. It is simple, straight forward. The aromatic blend of mouth watering masalas and the splutering of onions in hot oil is the perfect composition....soothing to your senses. Try it, highly recommended.

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    Replies
    1. V-In-Y, I am so glad to get your feedback. It is so encouraging. Do try out some more and let me know how they come out!

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